Some Amazing Land Has Been Protected in the Maine Woods

Tent and canoe next to the Cold Stream "deadwater" above Upper Cold Stream Falls in Maine's Northern Forest. Sunrise. Johnson Mountain Township.

Tent and canoe next to the Cold Stream “deadwater” above Upper Cold Stream Falls in Maine’s Northern Forest. Sunrise. Johnson Mountain Township.

Last month, more than 8,000 acres of Maine Woods in the Cold Stream watershed near The Forks was conserved after many years of work by The Trust for Public Land, Trout Unlimited, and other organizations. The newly conserved lands protect significant white-tailed deer wintering grounds and some of the best wild, native brook trout habitat in the state (Maine contains 97% of the intact, non-stocked lake and pond brook trout habitat in the eastern US.) There is a great article in the Portland Press Herald detailing the project. I first wrote about Cold Stream almost four years ago in this blog post after spending three days shooting images there for The Trust for Public Land. That trip was definitely one of the two or three highlights of my summer that year, and I am very pleased to see this project has come to fruition in 2016.

It seems that every year, I end up working at least a few days in the Maine woods, and looking back over the last 20 years I realize that a tremendous amount of good conservation has happened in what is the biggest chunk of undeveloped land in the eastern US, and home to the final several hundred miles of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail. The Cold Stream news inspired me to take a look through my archives and pull out some images from past projects in northern Maine. You can see them in this gallery, or in the slide show below. We’re blessed here in northern New England to have access to these beautiful places!

Cheers!
-Jerry

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